Category Archives: Hot blah, blah…

Do you live life as a classicist or a jazzer?

Although I like to consider myself more of a “jazzer” (“able to improv through life”) than a “classicist” (“plays life like a score: no surprises & well-rehearsed”), when life doesn’t “work,” I quickly become a classicist.

Take this morning and my Jeep.  Please!  Take it!  Somewhere within its electrical system is a tiny wire or a little fuse that has decided to render the thing dead.

So at 6 AM, I began to improvise: juggling this person here to fulfill that need there, emailing so-and-so to ward off affecting you-know-who.  Plotting, planning, thinking, scheming…

Etc., etc., etc.

So as a “jazzer,” you’d think I’d love this early morning composition, which has been more like a frantic bebop piece than a cool ballad.  But I’m not.  No, I’m really, really not!  In fact, I wish my life was a classical score so I could go practice, nail my part, and bow to wondrous applause.

So how about you?

“Jazzer” or “classicist?”


Red to Green

I’m taking a blog-break to alert you to a great deal!

The Red to Green Sale.

In honor of Valentine’s Day and concluding on St. Patrick’s Day, my publisher is offering the Kindle version of Tears of Min Brock for $2.99!

To purchase, click Red to Green!

Here are what others are saying about the book…

“I found this to be one of my favorite books of the year, and am looking forward to the sequel. Lowder writes a story that does not disappoint.” Tic Toc review

“I have again found one of those fascinating epic fantasy worlds that are daunting and dangerous, yet broodingly beautiful as well.” Taking it One Page at a Time

“As the book began, I thought the characters of Elabea and Galadin reminded me of Katniss and Gale from Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games.”  Literary R&R

“Reading Tears of Min Brock felt like a mature version of a Narnia type adventure. Like Dekker’s work, it is darker but not in a way that traumatizes a faint reader. I found Tears of Min Brock a well-told read, one where with older children the story could be a family nightly reading adventure.”  The Cypress Times


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